Army Air Force Statistical Digest: World War II (Second Printing) 1945

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“Army Air Forces Statistical Digest (World War II) published by the Office of Statistical Control, Headquarters, Army Air Forces, makes available in one volume and on a uniform basis summary statistics on AAF personnel, aircraft, equipment, combat operations and other activities during World War II.” The Army Air Faroes Statistical 1>1Mert(World war II), pWllehed bT the arfice of Stat1etical Control, Headquarters, Arrq Air Forces, JDBkesavailable in one vol1.llle and on a Wliform basb SllIIlIIIlU7statistios on AAF personnel, a1rcraf’t, equipaent, combat operations lIIld other activities during World War II. Since March 1942, the ottice of Statistical Control bas been oharged with the reepanaibU1t7 fer colleoting, p.-OO8llsiJlg,~.iJlg and presenting statistics on all Iilall8s of AAF strength lIIld activity. It bas been the practice to make these data available to interested offices in the form of recun’ing and apeoial reports. The eummary statistics publiehed in this volume were derived fran these reports and from the more detailed information available in the tiles of the Office of Statistical Control. Unless otherwise indicated, the statistics cover the strength lIIld operations of the II.rrrry Air Forces only. In a few cases where combinations have been made lIith other Arr:r:f lIIld Navy figures, the ooverage and character of the data have been olearly noted. ‘tlhile most of the statistics included here are mont~ for the period Pearl Harbor to V-J Day, a few important series are carried back for a longer’period. The detailed statistics on JJ3 strength and operations collected during World War II were used in analyses lIIld studies for the CommandingGeneral, ArI11¥ Air Forces, and staff offioers at all echelons of cOlllllllUld. IiIaD;y relationships wers derived !rom, lIIld analJrt,ical uses made of, these basic statistics during World War II. For example, as a result of a detailed stUIt’ of the ratios of heavy bomber crews to heavy bomber airplanes in the European and !lediterranean Theaters of Operations in the fall of 1944, heavy balIber crews were transferred !rom ETC to arro in order to achieve greater balance in both theaters. To cite another EIX8IIlple, uage data euoh as gasoline oonSUlllption, bombtonnage dropped and sirplo.ne losses were related to operating data like tJ,ying time and oombat sorties to oompute planning factors upon whioh supply requirements were baaed. A stUIt’ of bombtonnage dropped in 1943 indicated that planned production lIould be considerabq in excess of potential future bombconsumption oomputed on the basis of available airplanes, their bomb-oarrying capacity lIIld their estimated rate of use, plus a liberal allowanoe for strategio reserves. To put it another way, bomb production was out of balance with the other elements in the Air Faroes p.-ogram. Based on this anaqais, planned bombproduction was decreased, yielding a saving of several billion dollars • The sources of all of the figures in the vol1ml8, unless otherwise noted, lIere the standardized statistical reports instituted bT the arfice of Statistical Control. These reports, originating at group and base levels, moved up through all the echelons of cOlllllllUldto AAF Headquarters, and enabled statistical offices at each level to prepare consolidated reports for their organizations. The final consolidation prepared at the top eohelon of oOlllllllUld,then, constituted an over-all report of the world-wide AAF • To facilitate the use of this volu

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